USS CONCORD (AFS/TAFS-5) Veterans Association

CHARLESTON S.C. INFO

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Welcome to Charleston. Get ready to soak up history, sun and shopping in one of the friendliest, oldest, and most delicious cities in our country. Here is a list of the most chosen visited highlights for your consideration. (Dont forget the Shrimp and grits)Wink

Here are a few opening suggestions to whet your appetite:

PATRIOTS POINT 

Located on historic Charleston Harbor, Patriots Point is home to USS Yorktown (CV-10), the "Fighting Lady.  The "Fighting Lady" contains all the evidence of her past; one can see, touch, feel, and smell the past... where young Americans fought and died to turn the fortunes of war in the Pacific. Onboard the Yorktown are dozens of displays devoted to maritime and naval history, the Congressional Medal of Honor Society's museum and headquarters, and more than two dozen historic military aircraft are on exhibit. Ashore is a full-size Navy Advance Tactical Support Base from the Vietnam era, and a gift shop.

Moored next to her is WW II destroyer USS Laffey (DD-724), Laffey survived the onslaught of Japanese kamikaze attacks while off Okinawa as Radar Picket Station #1 on April 16, 1945. She became known as "the ship that wouldn't die."

Also moored alongside are the Coast Guard cutter Ingham (WHEC-35), which fought in the convoy battles of the North Atlantic and sank a German U-boat, and the diesel attack submarine USS Clamagore (SS-343).
 

H.L. HUNLEY
 
On the night of February 17, 1864, the H.L. Hunley embarked on a dangerous mission that would forever mark her place in history. Eight men, led by Lt. George Dixon, entered an experimental vessel that was to become the first successful submarine in world history, with a mission to sink an enemy ship, the USS Housatonic. That night, the Hunley rammed her spar torpedo into the hull of the Housatonic. She then surfaced long enough for her crew to signal their comrades on the shore of Sullivan's Island with a blue magnesium light,(or lantern) indicating a successful mission. The shore crew stoked their signal fires and anxiously awaited the Hunley's safe return. But minutes after her historic achievement, the Hunley and all hands onboard vanished into the sea without a trace. That night history was made. At the same moment, a mystery was born., But why had she suddenly disappeared? What caused her to sink? And would she ever be found?

Once the H.L. Hunley was raised from her watery grave on August 8, 2000, she was immediately transported to the Warren Lasch Conservation Center. As soon as the H.L. Hunley arrived at the Conservation Center, she was placed in a large steel tank filled with 55,000 gallons of chilled fresh water. Here, the mysteries of how and why she met her tragic fate will be revealed and the entire vessel will be conserved for posterity, as part of a permanent museum display.
 
The H.L. Hunley is unique in that she is essentially a time capsule, holding all the contents she held the night she sunk over a century ago during one of the most famous naval battles of all time. The excavation and analysis of the H.L. Hunley continues to provide many clues for archaeologists, conservators, anthropologists, and historians as they seek to understand the events that led to the loss of the H.L. Hunley and her crew, events that also led to the dawn of the modern era in submarine technology.
 

BOONE HALL PLANTATION
 Boone Hall Plantation has been open to the public since 1959. The McRae Family purchased the plantation in 1955 and it was Mrs. McRae who furnished the house with antiques and began giving tours. Today, the McRae Family still owns the property, and they continue to make improvements to the plantation so that you, the visitor, can experience what plantation life was like in the 1800s. Boone Hall is also one of America's oldest working, living plantations. They have been continuously growing and producing crops for over 320 years. Once known for cotton and pecans, they are still actively producing peaches, strawberries, tomatoes and pumpkins, as well as many other fruits and vegetables for visitors to enjoy.

Boone Hall Plantation also presents live presentations that cannot be found on any other plantations in the area and are part of what helps make Boone Hall unique. Shows such as "Exploring the Gullah Culture", give visitors the opportunity to experience through song, dance, and language...life lessons of the Gullah Culture adapted by African slaves. The show's host Ms. Sharon Cooper gives an outstanding performance that has proven to be one of the most popular shows in the Lowcountry area. Performances take place at our Gullah Theater located at the end of Slave Street.

 

To really get a feel of what is awaiting you in Charleston, click the Traveler link below and visit this source for all things Charleston.

TRAVELER MAGAZINE

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The USS Concord AFS/TAFS 5 Association is a not-for profit and tax free organization IAW 501(c) 19. Dues \ donations however are non tax deductible.
All of our membership dues and other contributions directly fund the association functions, events, and necessary expenditures associated with maintaining our organization.

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